Buying and selling real estate is a tough game these days. The US Census reports that the average new home price has skyrocketed to $371,000 since the last big boom in 2007. It’s a more competitive market than ever, even among existing real estate, which surged in 2017 to more than $250,000 for an average home. And it becomes even more difficult to complete a transaction when you have a dog on either side of the fence…

Cute Dog

Image via Pixabay

Before you go

Whether you are moving with a mastiff or your Chihuahua needs a change of scenery, there are a few things all dog owners should look for in a new home. These include:

  • Access to veterinary care. As a dedicated dog lover, you’ll want quality veterinary care available within a few miles of your new home. Being within 10 miles of an emergency or after-hours animal clinic is a bonus.
  • Proximity to pet-friendly public spaces. Rover needs room to romp, and sometimes the backyard simply isn’t big enough. Look for a home that is within walking or easy driving distance to public areas open to your canine companion. In addition to having new places to explore, your dog will benefit from socializing with his new four-legged friends.
  • Breed bans. As unfair (and unwarranted) as it may be, many cities have passed and vehemently enforce certain breed restrictions. Denver’s Ordinance Sec. 8 – 55, for example, clearly states that pitbull breeds are not welcome within city limits. The ban specifically names three distinct types of dog: Staffordshire Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, and American Pit Bull Terrier.

During the move

Ideally, you should keep your dog’s routine on track while you’re packing and planning. In order to make the move as minimally stressful as possible you may also try the following:

  • Pack right, packrat. Chances are, your current home is more than three times the size of your grandparents. And, even a small space can contain as many as 300,000 items. Your dog probably knows every single one of them and considers it part of his territory. Pack slowly over time to avoid setting your pet’s internal alarms to panic.
  • Call for backup. Moving day – and the days leading up to it – are always a flurry of activity. Your dog will have ample opportunity to sneak away while you’re distracted making sure all of that stuff fits properly in the moving truck. Consider placing your paranoid pooch in the care of a trusted pet sitter until you’re ready to head down the highway.

When it’s your house up for grabs

It’s a sad fact but having a dog in the home makes your property less desirable to many buyers. But, there are things you can do to exile the evidence of what buyers may perceive as a pesky pet. Stage your home for selling success with these tips:

  • Decontaminate and declutter. Tennis balls, chew toys, and even doggie dishes may be an endearing part of your day-to-day life. However, these tiny trinkets may be a huge turnoff to others. Take care to remove your dog’s things prior to each showing. And take Spot with you. A barking or nervous dog may sabotage your sale.
  • Use illusion and lighting to your advantage. Buyers want bright, open spaces where they can envision their new lives. Remove your personal photos and artwork from the wall, repair any nail holes, and add a fresh coat of a light and bright neutral paint. ClosetBox, a nationwide self-storage provider, additionally suggests strategically placing mirrors and metallic decor throughout the home to add more light and create the illusion of added space. For more tips on selling a home with pets, check out this post by Realtor.com.

Remember, there is no cookie-cutter solution for buying or selling a home when you have pets to consider. Your best bet on all fronts is to keep calm and take good care of your favorite Fido. Although there may be a few nerve-wracking weeks, be assured that dogs are adaptable and typically adjust quickly whether you’re moving across town or across the country.

 

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Filed under: Relocating and/or Traveling With Your Dog

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