brown tick

Picture courtesy of Wikipedia

Revolting parasitic arachnids such as ticksticks are bad for your dog’s health and make no mistake…the blood-sucking beasts feed on your pooch’s skin and transmit nasty viruses when feasting. Ticks carry diseases like Lyme disease and can cause paralysis, and even death.

Thankfully, there are a few things you can do to prevent your infestation of the disease-spreading free-loaders. Take down ticks with these tips and keep your dog safe.

Tidy up potential nesting places at home

yard

Picture courtesy of Flickr

Prevent the potential for invasive nesting! Ticks like long grass, piles of leaves, and humid overgrown bushes. If your back garden is less lawn and more rainforest, chances are the ticks are out there waiting to brush up against your doggie’s inviting fur.

Avoid the tick’s habitat

tick habitat

Picture courtesy of Pixabay

The tick’s natural habitat is naturally, all the places your dog loves investigating – bushes, shrubs, vegetative woodland, and overgrown grassy areas. Try not to let them wander into such parts – it’s rife with ticks lying in wait for furry creatures such as your dog and to hitch a tasty ride. What happens next? It gets straight to work on your best friend’s blood! Wooded areas of natural decay are fertile breeding ground for ticks. Keep your pooch to the path as much as you can.

Groom

brushing dog

Picture courtesy of Wikipedia

If you’ve been out for a walk then it’s time for a scrupulous comb through your pet’s fur to hunt for uninvited guests!  Don’t leave any skin uninvestigated and don’t forget his tummy, tail, and ears. Feel around for tiny lumps and bumps.

Remove the tick

ticks

Picture courtesy of Wikipedia

 

Discovered a tick? It’ll likely be engorged on your dog’s blood. Key to removal and utterly crucial is to not, whatsoever, simply pull back the tick from your dog or twist it off. This will increase the likelihood of infection! Similarly, don’t crush the tick – doing so exposes your dog to greater risk of infection. It’s a delicate procedure. Get yourself a pair of tweezers or even pick up a tick removal kit from your local pet supplier.

Grasp the tick’s head carefully and pull gently and slowly, but also deliberately. Don’t let go until it lets go of your dog. Then dispose as you would any other small pest.

Repel and vaccinate

veterinarian and dog

Picture courtesy of McConnell

There are repellents such as oral medication, sprays and of course, tick collars. Ask your vet about the different items you can use to protect your pet. Also, there are plenty of preventative procedures for the diseases spread by ticks. Dog vaccination, such as the Lyme disease vaccination is a good, secure method of disease prevention for your vulnerable pal.  The Lyme disease vaccine can help prevent disease caused by the Lyme disease organism.  It is important that you ask your veterinarian if your dog should have this vaccine though, as it is not necessarily recommended for all dogs.

Home

tired dog

Picture courtesy of Pixabay

Ticks can infest your home. Via your pet or sometimes clothing, the nasty pests can make their comfort in your fabrics, thick carpets, and upholstery.  Check that they haven’t latched onto anything! Anything similar to their natural habitat is a likely culprit, so search and vacuum. Don’t forget your dog’s sleeping place. Vacuum, wash, and if you need to replace their bed, get it replaced!

Best of luck in ticking off the threat to your dog’s happiness for good.

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Filed under: Dog Care

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