Most dogs come from good homes and have been well-treated their entire lives. Unfortunately, though, this isn’t the case with every canine out there. Some have lived as strays, suffered neglect or even abuse at the hands of their owners. If you’re planning on adopting a rescue dog, then I salute you. However, there are a few important things you should know about adopting a rescue dog.

Pet Adoption

Image from Pixabay

Seeing as you’re getting your dog from a shelter, odds are it’s not a puppy. If this is the case, then you’ll need to know the age and breed of the dog you’ve got your eye on. This has to to do with the pet insurance you’ll get more than anything else. Before insurers will approve a policy, they need to know how old your dog is. Unfortunately, shelters won’t always know the age of the dogs they rescue. However, you can always pop into a vet and have them do an estimation for you. The breed can also be a factor when it comes to insurance. Pedigrees are obviously going to be more expensive than mongrels. If your policies are going to cost you an arm and a leg, then you may have to reconsider.

Another thing you should know is that adopting an adult rescue dog can often be harder than adopting a puppy. This may sound surprising, but think about it. An adult dog is more likely to be used to a house. However, if that house was suitable for your dog, it wouldn’t have ended up at the shelter. Dogs who have had negligent owners in the past may also be prone to aggressive outbursts and may damage your home. Whatever conditions they’re used to, it will show up in their behavior. You’ll need to put in a bit of work to help them settle into your home. It may help to talk to the shelter staff about the dog’s history so you know what to expect.

Pet Adoption

Image from Pixabay

Finally, there may be a “honeymoon period”. It’s important not to let this throw you off-guard. Moving into a new home is a stressful and sometimes scary experience for a dog. Some will go absolutely crazy, dashing around the home and barking at everything. Others will react by lying down and not doing anything. The latter is what I mean by a honeymoon period. After about a month of this, your dog will have relaxed a little, and will want to explore the house. This is when they might fall back into their old, problematic behavior, which could have been the cause of them being donated in the first place. This can be stressful to deal with, but I urge you not to be another person who gave up. Get your dog used to how you run things, all the while being a calm and kind owner.

Bringing a rescue dog home isn’t always easy. However, when you consider the life you’ve saved this animal from, it’s one of the most rewarding things you can do. Please bear this in mind before you bring your rescue dog home.

Filed under: Adopt A Dog Or Cat

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